Leaders Anticipate and Defuse Excuses

Aren’t excuses so predictable? You almost hold back from asking “Hey, Bill, have you got your TPS report ready?” because you know you’ll hear “I would, but I’m still waiting for Hillary to get the cover page ready.” If you know you’re going to hear an excuse about someone else not delivering, why not head it off at the … Read more…

Leaders Never Shame

Good leaders never use shame or public demeaning as a leadership tool. Discomfort, yes. New situations, a bit of a comfort zone stretch, some natural consequences to actions, sure. But shame – to make someone feel guilty as a motivator to change – will only hurt relationships, make observers wary, and send the message that such tactics are okay … Read more…

Leaders Make It Easy To Know Them

Some leaders are open and transparent with others, and some are more private. But if that privacy is segregating their personal life and history to such an extent that their team feels like they don’t know them, then that leader is at a disadvantage. Leaders who make it easy to get to know them have an easier time developing relationship … Read more…

Leaders Never Send Passive-Aggressive Emails

Some leaders are afraid to directly address self-centered behaviors. Examples include messes, parking in the wrong spot, and abusing the printer or copier. What happens then, is the leader (attempting to solve an obvious problem) sends out an all-purpose missive, rather than addressing people directly. This is an error. Because, the people it is directed … Read more…

Leaders Deal with Messes (literally)

About 80 times per year, Group Dynamic workshop participants will make a “selfish behaviors” list, so we have something to refer to as we work toward better ways of maintaining high standards through effective, relationship-based leadership. Most common concerns include lateness of delivery or arrival, or lack of initiative. But there’s an equally common area … Read more…

Leaders Set Communication Standards

Communication. Always a concern. Two areas that get the best of us are: Speed of response Method of communication One team I worked with recently was typical: There was a broad range of expected response times. When we surveyed the group, asking the question “What’s your personal standard for responding to email?” the answers ranged … Read more…