Leaders Never Send Passive-Aggressive Emails

Some leaders are afraid to directly address self-centered behaviors. Examples include messes, parking in the wrong spot, and abusing the printer or copier. What happens then, is the leader (attempting to solve an obvious problem) sends out an all-purpose missive, rather than addressing people directly. This is an error. Because, the people it is directed … Read more…

Leaders Deal with Messes (literally)

About 80 times per year, Group Dynamic workshop participants will make a “selfish behaviors” list, so we have something to refer to as we work toward better ways of maintaining high standards through effective, relationship-based leadership. Most common concerns include lateness of delivery or arrival, or lack of initiative. But there’s an equally common area … Read more…

Leaders Set Communication Standards

Communication. Always a concern. Two areas that get the best of us are: Speed of response Method of communication One team I worked with recently was typical: There was a broad range of expected response times. When we surveyed the group, asking the question “What’s your personal standard for responding to email?” the answers ranged … Read more…

Leaders Use this Phrase in Critical Feedback

Please give frequent feedback to the people you lead. This is your responsibility. But please avoid giving feedback to the people who lead you, unless they purposefully request it. It’s not your role. Also, avoid giving feedback to your peers, unless they purposefully request it. It’s not your role. When peers or leaders do ask … Read more…

Leaders Make Others Comfortable with their Seasonal Greetings

Let’s make this easy. If your religious or political convictions are strong, AND you believe that you are called to use your leadership position to do everything in your power to bring your team members around to your point of view, this post is not for you. Go watch the small but lovely film “The … Read more…

Leaders Ask for More

Leaders develop their people — it’s important to help them grow, to make yourself more effective by delegating, and to see who could advance to leadership themselves. A first step to determine readiness is to simply ask for more. This could be either faster delivery, more complete work, or greater pro-activity. HereĀ are four approaches, each … Read more…