Leaders Need to Speak Out

People who speak out tend to be willing to volunteer bold ideas, even if it will put their credibility on the line. If we hold back and play it safe to preserve our credibility, we can make mistakes. I was part of a hiring committee for a non-profit leadership position once. One of the finalists, … Read more…

Leaders Need to be Adventurous

People who are adventurous enjoy the excitement of taking risks and are comfortable with the unknown. Caution is good at times, but not in a visioning phase. Can you name any worthwhile endeavor that didn’t involve some risk? A local community group once had the opportunity to shoot for the moon on raising money and awareness … Read more…

Leaders Practice Adaptation

Leaders and experts speak highly of the ability to adapt; people who can adapt to changing situations have a growth mindset, rather than a fixed mindset, and can stay nimble in volatile times of change or uncertainty. Sometimes, though, the only time we can develop those skills are in actual crisis situations. Adversity helps us … Read more…

Alternatives to “to be honest…”

Leaders must avoid beginning sentences with, “To be honest…” Why? It sends the message that everything prior to this statement was a lie, or that it wasn’t totally true, and it casts your other communication into a less credible light. It also comes across as gossipy, and a leader mustn’t gossip. But that’s not what … Read more…

Leaders Give Second Chances

One of the toughest calls that a positive, needs-meeting leader must confront is when and how to give a second chance when someone goofs something up. And I choose that phrase “goof something up” deliberately; there are no second chances for clear firing offenses involving safety or the law. Still, there is so much in the … Read more…

Leaders Ask These Four Simple Questions

Recently, when covering the Four Levels of Maturity, we were on a quest to find an essential question that a person would ask at each level. Recall, the first two levels are somtimes referred to as acting “‘below the line”, whereas levels three and four are sometimes referred to as acting “above the line”, which … Read more…